The Resource Committed : the battle over involuntary psychiatric care, Dinah Miller, MD, Annette Hanson, MD ; foreword by Pete Early

Committed : the battle over involuntary psychiatric care, Dinah Miller, MD, Annette Hanson, MD ; foreword by Pete Early

Label
Committed : the battle over involuntary psychiatric care
Title
Committed
Title remainder
the battle over involuntary psychiatric care
Statement of responsibility
Dinah Miller, MD, Annette Hanson, MD ; foreword by Pete Early
Creator
Contributor
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • "Battle lines have been drawn over involuntary treatment. On one side, there are those who oppose involuntary psychiatric treatments under any condition. Activists who take up this cause often don't acknowledge that psychiatric symptoms can render people dangerous to themselves or others. They also don't allow for the idea that the civil rights of an individual may be at odds with the heartbreak of a caring family. On the other side are groups pushing for increased use of involuntary treatment. These proponents are quick to point out that people with psychiatric illnesses often don't recognize that they are ill, which (from their perspective) makes the discussion of civil rights moot. They may gloss over the sometimes dangerous side effects of psychiatric medications, and they often don't admit that patients, even after their symptoms have abated, are sometimes unhappy that treatment was inflicted upon them. In Committed, psychiatrists Dinah Miller and Annette Hanson offer a thought-provoking and engaging account of the controversy surrounding involuntary psychiatric care in the United States. They bring the issue to life with first-hand accounts from patients, clinicians, advocates, and opponents. Looking at practices such as seclusion and restraint, involuntary medication, and involuntary electroconvulsive therapy--all within the context of civil rights-- Miller and Hanson illuminate the personal consequences of this controversial practice through voices of people who have been helped by the treatment they had as well as those who have been traumatized by it. The authors explore the question of whether involuntary treatment has a role in preventing violence, suicide, and mass murder. They delve into the controversial use of court-ordered outpatient treatment at its best and at its worst. Finally, they examine innovative solutions--mental health court, crisis intervention training, and pretrial diversion--that are intended to expand access to care while diverting people who have serious mental illness out of the cycle of repeated hospitalization and incarceration. They also assess what psychiatry knows about the prediction of violence and the limitations of laws designed to protect the public"--
  • "Every mass shooting in America raises the question of whether there would be fewer such shootings if people who have mental illness were locked away. Of course, some perpetrators were already being treated when they acted, and some never gave any sign that they might be dangerous before they acted. Nevertheless, the question of involuntary commitment comes up over and over again when a mass shooting occurs. In Committed, psychiatrists Dinah Miller and Anne Hanson offer a comprehensive account of the controversy surrounding involuntary psychiatric care in the United States. Through interviews and cases they explore the clinicians, consumers, advocates, institutions, and laws involved. They talk with people who have been involuntarily committed--both those who have been helped by this treatment and those who have been traumatized by it--and with doctors who believe that more people with mental illness should be treated, even against their will. They talk with families, policemen, ED staff, judges, someone from the Church of Scientology, representatives from NAMI and APA, and medical administrators of inpatient facilities. They explore practices such as seclusion and restraint, involuntary medications, and involuntary electroconvulsive therapy--all within the context of civil rights. Miller and Hanson explain why some people push for increased involuntary treatment while others view psychiatrists as money-hungry power mongers and their medications as the cause, not the cure, of symptoms. The authors take a middle view, advocating for the limited and judicious use of involuntary and humane psychiatric care as a last resort when someone poses a danger to themselves or others"--
Assigning source
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Miller, Dinah
Dewey number
362.2
Index
index present
LC call number
RC455.2.E8
LC item number
M55 2016
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Hanson, Annette
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Mentally ill
  • Mental health services
  • Involuntary treatment
  • Psychiatric ethics
Label
Committed : the battle over involuntary psychiatric care, Dinah Miller, MD, Annette Hanson, MD ; foreword by Pete Early
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Machine generated contents note: Before We Get StartedPart One: The Patients Chapter 1: Eleanor and the Case against Involuntary Hospitalization Chapter 2: Lily and the Case for Civil CommitmentPart Two: The Battleground Chapter 3: Those in Favor of Involuntary Treatments E. Fuller Torrey and the Treatment Advocacy Center Ronald Honberg and NAMI Paul Summergrad and the American Psychiatric Association Chapter 4: Those against Involuntary Treatments The Citizens Commission on Human Rights Cecelia Brown and Janet Foner and MindFreedom International Daniel Fisher and the National Empowerment Center Ira Burnim and the Bazelon CenterPart Three: Civil Rights Chapter 5: Eleanor and Lily and the Process of Civil Commitment Chapter 6: Christina Schumacher and the History of Civil Commitment LawsPart Four: Hospitalization Chapter 7: Officer Scott Davis and Law Enforcement Chapter 8: Dr. Leonard Skivorski and the Emergency Department Chapter 9: Eleanor's Hospital Experience Chapter 10: Dr. Ray DePaulo and Inpatient Psychiatry at a University Hospital Chapter 11: Dr. Steven Sharfstein and Dr. Bruce Hershfield and Free-standing Psychiatric Hospitals Chapter 12: Dr. Annette Hanson and the Use of Seclusion and Restraint Chapter 13: Anthony Kelly and Involuntary Medications Chapter 14: Jim and Involuntary Electroconvulsive TherapyPart Five: Involuntary Outpatient Commitment Chapter 15: Marsha and Involuntary Outpatient Commitment Chapter 16: Outpatient Commitment by the Books Chapter 17: The Honorable Jack Lesser and Mental Health CourtsPart Six: A Danger to Self or to Others Chapter 18: Dan and Guns and Mental Illness Chapter 19: Bryan Stanley and Violence and Psychiatric Illness Chapter 20: Amy and Involuntary Treatment for Suicide Prevention Chapter 21: Will Forcing Treatment on People with Psychiatric Disorders Prevent Mass Murders?Part Seven: Future Directions Chapter 22: Transforming the BattlegroundReferencesAcknowledgments
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Forword / by Peter Earley -- Before We Get Started -- Part I. The Patients: 1. Eleanor and the Case against Involuntary Hospitalization ; 2. Lily and the Case for Civil Commitment -- Part II. The Battleground: 3. In Favor of Involuntary Treatments ; 4. Against Involuntary Treatments --Part III. Civil Rights: 5. Eleanor and Lily and the Process of Civil Commitment ; 6. Christina Schumacher and the History of Civil Commitment Laws -- Part IV. The Hospital: 7. Scott Davis onLaw Enforcement and Crisis Intervention Teams ; 8. Leonard Skivorski and the Emergency Department ; 9. Eleanor's Hospital Experience ; 10. Ray DePaulo and Inpatient Psychiatry at a University Hospital ; 11. Steven Sharfstein, Bruce Hershfield and Free-standing Psychiatric Hospitals ; 12. Annette Hanson and the Use of Seclusion and Restraint ; 13. Anthony Kelly and Involuntary Medications ; 14. Jim and Involuntary Electroconvulsive Therapy -- Part V. Involuntary Outpatient Commitment: 15. Marsha and Involuntary Outpatient Commitment ; 16. Outpatient Commitment by the Books ; 17. Jack Lesser and Mental Health Courts -- Part VI. A Danger to Self or to Others: 18. Dan, Guns and Mental Illness ; 19. Bryan Stanley and Violence and Psychiatric Illness ; 20. Amy and Involuntary Treatment for Suicide Prevention ; 21. Will Forcing Treatment on People with Psychiatric Disorders Prevent Mass Murders? -- Part VII. Future Directions: 22. Transforming the Battleground
Control code
ocn947074803
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xxiii, 298 pages
Isbn
9781421420783
Isbn Type
(hardback : acid-free paper)
Lccn
2016002161
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
  • BK0018716743
  • (OCoLC)947074803
Label
Committed : the battle over involuntary psychiatric care, Dinah Miller, MD, Annette Hanson, MD ; foreword by Pete Early
Publication
Note
Machine generated contents note: Before We Get StartedPart One: The Patients Chapter 1: Eleanor and the Case against Involuntary Hospitalization Chapter 2: Lily and the Case for Civil CommitmentPart Two: The Battleground Chapter 3: Those in Favor of Involuntary Treatments E. Fuller Torrey and the Treatment Advocacy Center Ronald Honberg and NAMI Paul Summergrad and the American Psychiatric Association Chapter 4: Those against Involuntary Treatments The Citizens Commission on Human Rights Cecelia Brown and Janet Foner and MindFreedom International Daniel Fisher and the National Empowerment Center Ira Burnim and the Bazelon CenterPart Three: Civil Rights Chapter 5: Eleanor and Lily and the Process of Civil Commitment Chapter 6: Christina Schumacher and the History of Civil Commitment LawsPart Four: Hospitalization Chapter 7: Officer Scott Davis and Law Enforcement Chapter 8: Dr. Leonard Skivorski and the Emergency Department Chapter 9: Eleanor's Hospital Experience Chapter 10: Dr. Ray DePaulo and Inpatient Psychiatry at a University Hospital Chapter 11: Dr. Steven Sharfstein and Dr. Bruce Hershfield and Free-standing Psychiatric Hospitals Chapter 12: Dr. Annette Hanson and the Use of Seclusion and Restraint Chapter 13: Anthony Kelly and Involuntary Medications Chapter 14: Jim and Involuntary Electroconvulsive TherapyPart Five: Involuntary Outpatient Commitment Chapter 15: Marsha and Involuntary Outpatient Commitment Chapter 16: Outpatient Commitment by the Books Chapter 17: The Honorable Jack Lesser and Mental Health CourtsPart Six: A Danger to Self or to Others Chapter 18: Dan and Guns and Mental Illness Chapter 19: Bryan Stanley and Violence and Psychiatric Illness Chapter 20: Amy and Involuntary Treatment for Suicide Prevention Chapter 21: Will Forcing Treatment on People with Psychiatric Disorders Prevent Mass Murders?Part Seven: Future Directions Chapter 22: Transforming the BattlegroundReferencesAcknowledgments
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Forword / by Peter Earley -- Before We Get Started -- Part I. The Patients: 1. Eleanor and the Case against Involuntary Hospitalization ; 2. Lily and the Case for Civil Commitment -- Part II. The Battleground: 3. In Favor of Involuntary Treatments ; 4. Against Involuntary Treatments --Part III. Civil Rights: 5. Eleanor and Lily and the Process of Civil Commitment ; 6. Christina Schumacher and the History of Civil Commitment Laws -- Part IV. The Hospital: 7. Scott Davis onLaw Enforcement and Crisis Intervention Teams ; 8. Leonard Skivorski and the Emergency Department ; 9. Eleanor's Hospital Experience ; 10. Ray DePaulo and Inpatient Psychiatry at a University Hospital ; 11. Steven Sharfstein, Bruce Hershfield and Free-standing Psychiatric Hospitals ; 12. Annette Hanson and the Use of Seclusion and Restraint ; 13. Anthony Kelly and Involuntary Medications ; 14. Jim and Involuntary Electroconvulsive Therapy -- Part V. Involuntary Outpatient Commitment: 15. Marsha and Involuntary Outpatient Commitment ; 16. Outpatient Commitment by the Books ; 17. Jack Lesser and Mental Health Courts -- Part VI. A Danger to Self or to Others: 18. Dan, Guns and Mental Illness ; 19. Bryan Stanley and Violence and Psychiatric Illness ; 20. Amy and Involuntary Treatment for Suicide Prevention ; 21. Will Forcing Treatment on People with Psychiatric Disorders Prevent Mass Murders? -- Part VII. Future Directions: 22. Transforming the Battleground
Control code
ocn947074803
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xxiii, 298 pages
Isbn
9781421420783
Isbn Type
(hardback : acid-free paper)
Lccn
2016002161
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
  • BK0018716743
  • (OCoLC)947074803

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