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The Resource The business of empire : United Fruit, race, and U.S. expansion in Central America, Jason M. Colby

The business of empire : United Fruit, race, and U.S. expansion in Central America, Jason M. Colby

Label
The business of empire : United Fruit, race, and U.S. expansion in Central America
Title
The business of empire
Title remainder
United Fruit, race, and U.S. expansion in Central America
Statement of responsibility
Jason M. Colby
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
The link between private corporations and U.S. world power has a much longer history than most people realize. Transnational firms such as the United Fruit Company represent an earlier stage of the economic and cultural globalization now taking place throughout the world. Drawing on a wide range of archival sources in the United States, Great Britain, Costa Rica, and Guatemala, Colby combines "top-down" and "bottom-up" approaches to provide new insight into the role of transnational capital, labor migration, and racial nationalism in shaping U.S. expansion into Central America and the greater Caribbean. The Business of Empire places corporate power and local context at the heart of U.S. imperial history. In the early twentieth century, U.S. influence in Central America came primarily in the form of private enterprise, above all United Fruit. Founded amid the U.S. leap into overseas empire, the company initially depended upon British West Indian laborers. When its black workforce resisted white American authority, the firm adopted a strategy of labor division by recruiting Hispanic migrants. This labor system drew the company into increased conflict with its host nations, as Central American nationalists denounced not only U.S. military interventions in the region but also American employment of black immigrants. By the 1930s, just as Washington renounced military intervention in Latin America, United Fruit pursued its own Good Neighbor Policy, which brought a reduction in its corporate colonial power and a ban on the hiring of black immigrants. The end of the company's system of labor division in turn pointed the way to the transformation of United Fruit as well as the broader U.S. empire. -- Book jacket
Member of
Cataloging source
NHI
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1974-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Colby, Jason M.
Dewey number
327.730728
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
LC call number
F1436.8.U6
LC item number
C65 2013
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
The United States in the world
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • United Fruit Company
  • Central America
  • United States
  • Central America
  • United States
  • Central America
  • Industrial relations
  • United Fruit Company
  • Commerce
  • Industrial relations
  • Diplomatic relations
  • Race relations
  • Central America
  • United States
Label
The business of empire : United Fruit, race, and U.S. expansion in Central America, Jason M. Colby
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 239-264) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Enterprise and expansion, 1848-1885 -- Joining the imperial world, 1885-1904 -- Corporate colonialism, 1904-1912 -- Divided workers, 1912-1921 -- The rise of Hispanic nationalism, 1921-1929 -- Reframing the empire, 1929-1940
Control code
ocn871173449
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xi, 274 pages
Isbn
9780801478994
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
(OCoLC)871173449
Label
The business of empire : United Fruit, race, and U.S. expansion in Central America, Jason M. Colby
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 239-264) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Enterprise and expansion, 1848-1885 -- Joining the imperial world, 1885-1904 -- Corporate colonialism, 1904-1912 -- Divided workers, 1912-1921 -- The rise of Hispanic nationalism, 1921-1929 -- Reframing the empire, 1929-1940
Control code
ocn871173449
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xi, 274 pages
Isbn
9780801478994
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
(OCoLC)871173449

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