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The Resource The making of a story : a Norton guide to creative writing, Alice LaPlante

The making of a story : a Norton guide to creative writing, Alice LaPlante

Label
The making of a story : a Norton guide to creative writing
Title
The making of a story
Title remainder
a Norton guide to creative writing
Statement of responsibility
Alice LaPlante
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
A guide to creative writing that introduces readers to each stage of the creative writing process and helps them build their writing skills through exercises and real-life examples
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1958-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
LaPlante, Alice
Dewey number
808/.042
Index
index present
LC call number
PE1408
LC item number
.L31887 2007
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • bibliography
  • handbooks
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • English language
  • English language
  • Creative writing
  • Report writing
  • Creative writing
  • English language
  • English language
  • Report writing
Label
The making of a story : a Norton guide to creative writing, Alice LaPlante
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 647-655) and index
Contents
  • Creative nonfiction : a working definition
  • Writing that is surprising yet convincing
  • Resisting paraphrase
  • Creative nonfiction : capturing what has eluded capture
  • On sentiment and sentimentality
  • Our first job as writers : to notice
  • Avoiding the "writerly" voice
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : "I don't know why I remember ..."
  • Acknowledgments
  • Exercise 2 : I am a camera
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "On keeping a notebook"
  • Joan Didion ---
  • "Emergency"
  • Denis Johnson
  • ch. 2.
  • The splendid gift of not knowing
  • pt. 1.
  • ch.1.
  • Writing as discovery
  • Getting started
  • What do you know?
  • Creative nonfiction : making the ordinary extraordinary
  • Writing down what you don't know (about what you know)
  • On rendering, not solving, the mysteries that surround us
  • Moving from "triggering" to real subject
  • Surprise yourself, interest others
  • Obsession as a creative virtue
  • pt. 2.
  • What is this thing called creative writing?
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : Things I was taught/things I was not taught
  • Exercise 2 : I want to know why
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "Where are you going, where have you been?"
  • Joyce Carol Oates
  • "Welcome to cancerland"
  • Barbara Ehrenreich
  • pt. 1.
  • The basics
  • Getting started
  • Reconciling the method with the madness
  • Some basic definitions
  • On seeing the general in the particular
  • On crowding the reader out of his own space
  • Don't lose any of your senses
  • Use of concrete details in creative nonfiction
  • Use and abuse of metaphor
  • When should you use metaphor?
  • Avoiding the "S" word : banishing conscious symbols from your writing
  • Imagery as creative source
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • ch. 3.
  • Exercise 1 : Harper's Index on a personal level
  • Exercise 2 : Render a tree, capture the forest
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "The
  • things they carried"
  • Tim O'Brien
  • "Nebraska"
  • Ron Hansen
  • Details, details
  • pt. 1.
  • Concrete details as the basic building blocks of good creative writing
  • Getting started
  • On thinking small
  • Defining "images" within a literary context
  • Imagery that works on two levels
  • To epiphany or not to epiphany?
  • Is change necessary? (the debate continues)
  • On not becoming slaves to theory
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : False epiphanies I have had
  • Exercise 2 : Opportunities not taken
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "What makes a short story?"
  • ch. 4.
  • Francine Prose
  • "Helping"
  • Robert Stone
  • ch. 5.
  • Why you need to show and tell
  • pt. 1.
  • The importance of narration
  • Getting started
  • Some basic definitions
  • Why "show not tell" is such common advice
  • The shapely story
  • The show-and-tell balancing act
  • Traditional uses of narration (telling)
  • Why narration is such an important creative tool
  • How showing and telling complement each other
  • Good intentions, bad advice
  • The showing-telling continuum
  • Showing and telling in creative nonfiction
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : Tell me a story
  • pt. 1.
  • Exercise 2 : What everyone knows/What I know
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "Brownies"
  • ZZ Packer
  • "Winner take nothing"
  • Bernard Cooper
  • Defining the short story
  • Getting started
  • Some basic definitions
  • The conflict-crisis-resolution model
  • Linear vs. modular stories
  • Second person
  • Third person
  • A word about attitude
  • Distance and point of view
  • Shifts in narrative distance
  • Choosing a point of view for your creative work
  • Point of view and creative nonfiction
  • Common point of view problems
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • ch. 6.
  • Exercise 1 : Change point of view and dance
  • Exercise 2 : Using point of view as a way "in" to difficult material
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "The
  • lady with the little dog"
  • Anton Chekhov
  • "Moonrise"
  • Penny Wolfson
  • ch. 7.
  • Who's telling this story, anyway?
  • How reliable is this narrator?
  • pt. 1.
  • How point of view affects our understanding of a story
  • Getting started
  • How we judge the integrity of the stories we hear and read
  • First person point of view and reliability
  • Third person point of view and reliability
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : He said, she said
  • pt. 1.
  • Exercise 2 : See what I see, hear what I hear
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "The
  • swimmer"
  • John Cheever
  • ch. 8.
  • You talking to me?
  • pt. 1.
  • Crafting effective dialogue
  • Introduction to point of view
  • Getting started
  • What dialogue is good for
  • What dialogue is not
  • A word about attribution
  • Five important tips on dialogue
  • On subtext
  • A word about dialect
  • Using placeholders
  • Dialogue in creative nonfiction
  • pt. 2.
  • Getting started
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : Nonverbal communication
  • Exercise 2 : Them's fighting words
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "Hills like white elephants"
  • Ernest Hemingway
  • "Inside the bunker"
  • John Sack
  • Some basic definitions
  • First person
  • Whose story is it?
  • On metafiction
  • Character-based plotting
  • On conflict
  • Analyzing plot points
  • Avoiding Scènes à Faire : recognizing clichéd plot twists
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : What's behind the door of room 101?
  • Exercise 2 : "By the time you read this ..."
  • pt. 3.
  • ch. 9.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "Sonny's blues"
  • James Baldwin
  • ch. 10.
  • Recognizable people
  • pt. 1.
  • Creating surprising-yet-convincing characters
  • Getting started
  • Flat vs. round characters
  • Eschewing the general in favor of the particular
  • The plot thickens
  • Consistency as the hobgoblin of characters
  • Ways of defining character
  • Character and plot
  • Wants and needs
  • Characters in relationships
  • Character in creative nonfiction
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : Emptying pockets
  • Exercise 2 : Sins of commissions/Sins of omission
  • pt. 1.
  • Exercise 3 : Seven or eight things I know about him/her
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "Surrounded by sleep"
  • Akhil Sharma
  • "No name woman"
  • Maxine Hong Kingston
  • Figuring out what happens next
  • Getting started
  • Story vs. plot : some basic definitions
  • A word about causality
  • Render how -- don't try to answer why
  • Starting in the middle
  • Beginning with action
  • On the nature of suspense
  • Beginning your creative nonfiction piece
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : Give it your best shot
  • Exercise 2 : Start in the middle
  • Exercise 3 : Make them squirm
  • pt. 3.
  • ch. 11.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "People like that are the only people here : canonical babbling in Peed Onk"
  • Lorrie Moore
  • ch. 12.
  • What's this creative work really about?
  • pt. 1.
  • The art of transferring true emotions onto sensory events
  • Getting started
  • Many different answers to the same question
  • Writing about what matters
  • Raising the curtain
  • Transference : borrowing from Freud
  • We are made of dust
  • The road to universality
  • But it's the truth! and other common pleas for clemency
  • Creative nonfiction : on being true as well as factual
  • Making things carry more emotional weight than they logically should
  • Transference and creative nonfiction
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : Getting an image to spill its secrets
  • pt. 1.
  • Exercise 2 : What I lost
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "Ralph the duck"
  • Frederick Busch
  • "The
  • knife"
  • Richard Selzer
  • Beginning your story, novel, or nonfiction piece
  • Getting started
  • Your contract with the reader
  • Characteristics of a good opening
  • Unbalancing acts
  • Undue influence : a cautionary tale
  • The developmental stages of a creative work
  • "Hot spots" and other noteworthy aspects of an early draft
  • An exercise-based approach to deep revision
  • A word about constraints
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Analytical/mechanical exercises
  • Creative exercises
  • Research-based exercises
  • ch. 13.
  • Chance-based exercises
  • Revision example : "The company of men"
  • Jan Ellison
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "Shitty first drafts"
  • Anne Lamott
  • "The
  • Carver chronicles"
  • D.T. Max
  • Learning to fail better
  • "The
  • bath"
  • Raymond Carver
  • "A
  • small, good thing"
  • Raymond Carver
  • ch. 14.
  • Getting beyond facts to truth
  • pt. 1.
  • Some final thoughts on creative nonfiction
  • pt. 1.
  • Getting started
  • Just the facts, ma'am
  • Recollections and re-creations
  • Ethical considerations
  • Subjectivity vs. objectivity
  • A trip of self-discovery
  • To be in or out of the story?
  • pt. 2.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "Learning to drive"
  • On revision
  • Katha Pollitt
  • Glossary--
  • Bibliography
  • List of stories
  • Permissions
  • Index
  • Getting started
  • Advice for writers from writers
  • Perfection is our enemy
  • The workshop method
Control code
ocm85833282
Dimensions
25 cm.
Edition
First edition.
Extent
677 pages
Isbn
9780393061642
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2007008030
System control number
(OCoLC)85833282
Label
The making of a story : a Norton guide to creative writing, Alice LaPlante
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 647-655) and index
Contents
  • Creative nonfiction : a working definition
  • Writing that is surprising yet convincing
  • Resisting paraphrase
  • Creative nonfiction : capturing what has eluded capture
  • On sentiment and sentimentality
  • Our first job as writers : to notice
  • Avoiding the "writerly" voice
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : "I don't know why I remember ..."
  • Acknowledgments
  • Exercise 2 : I am a camera
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "On keeping a notebook"
  • Joan Didion ---
  • "Emergency"
  • Denis Johnson
  • ch. 2.
  • The splendid gift of not knowing
  • pt. 1.
  • ch.1.
  • Writing as discovery
  • Getting started
  • What do you know?
  • Creative nonfiction : making the ordinary extraordinary
  • Writing down what you don't know (about what you know)
  • On rendering, not solving, the mysteries that surround us
  • Moving from "triggering" to real subject
  • Surprise yourself, interest others
  • Obsession as a creative virtue
  • pt. 2.
  • What is this thing called creative writing?
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : Things I was taught/things I was not taught
  • Exercise 2 : I want to know why
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "Where are you going, where have you been?"
  • Joyce Carol Oates
  • "Welcome to cancerland"
  • Barbara Ehrenreich
  • pt. 1.
  • The basics
  • Getting started
  • Reconciling the method with the madness
  • Some basic definitions
  • On seeing the general in the particular
  • On crowding the reader out of his own space
  • Don't lose any of your senses
  • Use of concrete details in creative nonfiction
  • Use and abuse of metaphor
  • When should you use metaphor?
  • Avoiding the "S" word : banishing conscious symbols from your writing
  • Imagery as creative source
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • ch. 3.
  • Exercise 1 : Harper's Index on a personal level
  • Exercise 2 : Render a tree, capture the forest
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "The
  • things they carried"
  • Tim O'Brien
  • "Nebraska"
  • Ron Hansen
  • Details, details
  • pt. 1.
  • Concrete details as the basic building blocks of good creative writing
  • Getting started
  • On thinking small
  • Defining "images" within a literary context
  • Imagery that works on two levels
  • To epiphany or not to epiphany?
  • Is change necessary? (the debate continues)
  • On not becoming slaves to theory
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : False epiphanies I have had
  • Exercise 2 : Opportunities not taken
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "What makes a short story?"
  • ch. 4.
  • Francine Prose
  • "Helping"
  • Robert Stone
  • ch. 5.
  • Why you need to show and tell
  • pt. 1.
  • The importance of narration
  • Getting started
  • Some basic definitions
  • Why "show not tell" is such common advice
  • The shapely story
  • The show-and-tell balancing act
  • Traditional uses of narration (telling)
  • Why narration is such an important creative tool
  • How showing and telling complement each other
  • Good intentions, bad advice
  • The showing-telling continuum
  • Showing and telling in creative nonfiction
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : Tell me a story
  • pt. 1.
  • Exercise 2 : What everyone knows/What I know
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "Brownies"
  • ZZ Packer
  • "Winner take nothing"
  • Bernard Cooper
  • Defining the short story
  • Getting started
  • Some basic definitions
  • The conflict-crisis-resolution model
  • Linear vs. modular stories
  • Second person
  • Third person
  • A word about attitude
  • Distance and point of view
  • Shifts in narrative distance
  • Choosing a point of view for your creative work
  • Point of view and creative nonfiction
  • Common point of view problems
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • ch. 6.
  • Exercise 1 : Change point of view and dance
  • Exercise 2 : Using point of view as a way "in" to difficult material
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "The
  • lady with the little dog"
  • Anton Chekhov
  • "Moonrise"
  • Penny Wolfson
  • ch. 7.
  • Who's telling this story, anyway?
  • How reliable is this narrator?
  • pt. 1.
  • How point of view affects our understanding of a story
  • Getting started
  • How we judge the integrity of the stories we hear and read
  • First person point of view and reliability
  • Third person point of view and reliability
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : He said, she said
  • pt. 1.
  • Exercise 2 : See what I see, hear what I hear
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "The
  • swimmer"
  • John Cheever
  • ch. 8.
  • You talking to me?
  • pt. 1.
  • Crafting effective dialogue
  • Introduction to point of view
  • Getting started
  • What dialogue is good for
  • What dialogue is not
  • A word about attribution
  • Five important tips on dialogue
  • On subtext
  • A word about dialect
  • Using placeholders
  • Dialogue in creative nonfiction
  • pt. 2.
  • Getting started
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : Nonverbal communication
  • Exercise 2 : Them's fighting words
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "Hills like white elephants"
  • Ernest Hemingway
  • "Inside the bunker"
  • John Sack
  • Some basic definitions
  • First person
  • Whose story is it?
  • On metafiction
  • Character-based plotting
  • On conflict
  • Analyzing plot points
  • Avoiding Scènes à Faire : recognizing clichéd plot twists
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : What's behind the door of room 101?
  • Exercise 2 : "By the time you read this ..."
  • pt. 3.
  • ch. 9.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "Sonny's blues"
  • James Baldwin
  • ch. 10.
  • Recognizable people
  • pt. 1.
  • Creating surprising-yet-convincing characters
  • Getting started
  • Flat vs. round characters
  • Eschewing the general in favor of the particular
  • The plot thickens
  • Consistency as the hobgoblin of characters
  • Ways of defining character
  • Character and plot
  • Wants and needs
  • Characters in relationships
  • Character in creative nonfiction
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : Emptying pockets
  • Exercise 2 : Sins of commissions/Sins of omission
  • pt. 1.
  • Exercise 3 : Seven or eight things I know about him/her
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "Surrounded by sleep"
  • Akhil Sharma
  • "No name woman"
  • Maxine Hong Kingston
  • Figuring out what happens next
  • Getting started
  • Story vs. plot : some basic definitions
  • A word about causality
  • Render how -- don't try to answer why
  • Starting in the middle
  • Beginning with action
  • On the nature of suspense
  • Beginning your creative nonfiction piece
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : Give it your best shot
  • Exercise 2 : Start in the middle
  • Exercise 3 : Make them squirm
  • pt. 3.
  • ch. 11.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "People like that are the only people here : canonical babbling in Peed Onk"
  • Lorrie Moore
  • ch. 12.
  • What's this creative work really about?
  • pt. 1.
  • The art of transferring true emotions onto sensory events
  • Getting started
  • Many different answers to the same question
  • Writing about what matters
  • Raising the curtain
  • Transference : borrowing from Freud
  • We are made of dust
  • The road to universality
  • But it's the truth! and other common pleas for clemency
  • Creative nonfiction : on being true as well as factual
  • Making things carry more emotional weight than they logically should
  • Transference and creative nonfiction
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Exercise 1 : Getting an image to spill its secrets
  • pt. 1.
  • Exercise 2 : What I lost
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "Ralph the duck"
  • Frederick Busch
  • "The
  • knife"
  • Richard Selzer
  • Beginning your story, novel, or nonfiction piece
  • Getting started
  • Your contract with the reader
  • Characteristics of a good opening
  • Unbalancing acts
  • Undue influence : a cautionary tale
  • The developmental stages of a creative work
  • "Hot spots" and other noteworthy aspects of an early draft
  • An exercise-based approach to deep revision
  • A word about constraints
  • pt. 2.
  • Exercises
  • Analytical/mechanical exercises
  • Creative exercises
  • Research-based exercises
  • ch. 13.
  • Chance-based exercises
  • Revision example : "The company of men"
  • Jan Ellison
  • pt. 3.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "Shitty first drafts"
  • Anne Lamott
  • "The
  • Carver chronicles"
  • D.T. Max
  • Learning to fail better
  • "The
  • bath"
  • Raymond Carver
  • "A
  • small, good thing"
  • Raymond Carver
  • ch. 14.
  • Getting beyond facts to truth
  • pt. 1.
  • Some final thoughts on creative nonfiction
  • pt. 1.
  • Getting started
  • Just the facts, ma'am
  • Recollections and re-creations
  • Ethical considerations
  • Subjectivity vs. objectivity
  • A trip of self-discovery
  • To be in or out of the story?
  • pt. 2.
  • Reading as a writer
  • "Learning to drive"
  • On revision
  • Katha Pollitt
  • Glossary--
  • Bibliography
  • List of stories
  • Permissions
  • Index
  • Getting started
  • Advice for writers from writers
  • Perfection is our enemy
  • The workshop method
Control code
ocm85833282
Dimensions
25 cm.
Edition
First edition.
Extent
677 pages
Isbn
9780393061642
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2007008030
System control number
(OCoLC)85833282

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