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The Resource Why read the classics?, Italo Calvino ; translated from the Italian by Martin McLaughlin

Why read the classics?, Italo Calvino ; translated from the Italian by Martin McLaughlin

Label
Why read the classics?
Title
Why read the classics?
Statement of responsibility
Italo Calvino ; translated from the Italian by Martin McLaughlin
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Italo Calvino was not only a prolific master of fiction, he was also an uncanny reader of literature, a keen critic of astonishing range. This is the most comprehensive collection of Calvino's literary criticism available in English, accounting for the enduring importance to our lives of crucial writers of the Western canon. Here--spanning more than two millennia, from antiquity to postmodernism--are thirty-six immediately relevant, elegantly written, accessible ruminations on the writers, poets, and scientists who meant most to Calvino at different stages of his life. At a time when the Western canon and the very notion of "literary greatness" have come under increasing disparagement by the vanguard of so-called multiculturalism, Calvino gives us an inspiring corrective.--From publisher description
Member of
Additional physical form
Also issued online.
Cataloging source
DLC
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/collectionName
Perché leggere i classici
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Calvino, Italo
Dewey number
809
Index
index present
LC call number
PN81
LC item number
.C25513 1999
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Canon (Literature)
  • Literature
  • Canon (Literature)
  • Literature
Label
Why read the classics?, Italo Calvino ; translated from the Italian by Martin McLaughlin
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
Why read the classics? -- The odysseys within The Odyssey -- Xenophon's Anabasis -- Ovid and universal contiguity -- The sky, man, the elephant -- Nezami's seven princesses -- Tirant lo blanc -- The structure of the Orlando furioso -- Brief anthology of Octaves from Ariosto -- Gerolamo Cardano -- The book of nature in Galileo -- Cyrano on the moon -- Robinson Crusoe, journal of mercantile virtues -- Candide, or concerning narrative rapidity -- Denis Diderot, Jacques le fataliste -- Giammaria Ortes -- Knowledge as dust-cloud in Stendhal -- Guide for new readers of Stendhal's Charterhouse -- The city as novel in Balzac -- Charles Dickens, Our mutual friend -- Gustave Flaubert, Trois contes -- Leo Tolstoy, Two Hussars -- Mark Twain, The man that corrupted Hadleyburg -- Henry James, Daisy Miller -- Robert Louis Stevenson, The pavilion on the links -- Conrad's captains -- Pasternak and the Revolution -- The world is an artichoke -- Carlo Emilio Gadda, the Pasticciaccio -- Eugenio Montale, 'Forse un mattino andando' -- Montale's cliff -- Hemingway and ourselves -- Francis Ponge -- Jorge Luis Borges -- The philosophy of Raymond Queneau -- Pavese and human sacrifice
Control code
ocm40940087
Dimensions
25 cm.
Edition
1st American ed.
Extent
x, 277 p.
Isbn
9780679415244
Lccn
99021535
Label
Why read the classics?, Italo Calvino ; translated from the Italian by Martin McLaughlin
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
Why read the classics? -- The odysseys within The Odyssey -- Xenophon's Anabasis -- Ovid and universal contiguity -- The sky, man, the elephant -- Nezami's seven princesses -- Tirant lo blanc -- The structure of the Orlando furioso -- Brief anthology of Octaves from Ariosto -- Gerolamo Cardano -- The book of nature in Galileo -- Cyrano on the moon -- Robinson Crusoe, journal of mercantile virtues -- Candide, or concerning narrative rapidity -- Denis Diderot, Jacques le fataliste -- Giammaria Ortes -- Knowledge as dust-cloud in Stendhal -- Guide for new readers of Stendhal's Charterhouse -- The city as novel in Balzac -- Charles Dickens, Our mutual friend -- Gustave Flaubert, Trois contes -- Leo Tolstoy, Two Hussars -- Mark Twain, The man that corrupted Hadleyburg -- Henry James, Daisy Miller -- Robert Louis Stevenson, The pavilion on the links -- Conrad's captains -- Pasternak and the Revolution -- The world is an artichoke -- Carlo Emilio Gadda, the Pasticciaccio -- Eugenio Montale, 'Forse un mattino andando' -- Montale's cliff -- Hemingway and ourselves -- Francis Ponge -- Jorge Luis Borges -- The philosophy of Raymond Queneau -- Pavese and human sacrifice
Control code
ocm40940087
Dimensions
25 cm.
Edition
1st American ed.
Extent
x, 277 p.
Isbn
9780679415244
Lccn
99021535

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